The 200 Greatest Horror Films of All Time

Horror is one of the most primal types of films. Perhaps some of the first stories humans ever told were of the horror genre, warning of the beasts and monsters that lurked outside at night. Now special effects and other narrative techniques work to bring tales of modern monsters to billions across the globe. This list of 200 horror films is a guide for both a film neophyte wanting to see the best of the best and a film expert looking for a masterpiece she may have overlooked.

Each musical was ranked according to list sources from four different categories. Then those categories were weighted to give a final ranking. Those categories are, from most important to least important:

Genre Acclaim -> Prestige -> Popularity -> Awards

You can see rankings in each category as well as the source lists each film was ranked in under each movie’s title. (Follow this link for more information)

Alien.jpg

#1) Alien

(1979 - dir. Ridley Scott)

#4 -> #10 -> #4 -> #15

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Complex The Scariest Movies of All Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Esquire 50 Scariest Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Roger Ebert’s Great Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Hollywood Reporter Hollywood's 100 Favorite Films, All-Time Box Office by Ticket Sales, Empire Readers’ 100 Greatest Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Won the Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation.

Naming Alien the Greatest Horror Movie of All Time is bound to be a bit controversial. Although nearly everyone agrees it qualifies as a horror movie, it’s quite a bit different than most other classics of the genre. It’s in space. It’s sci-fi. And there’s no real sense of the supernatural.

There are two stars in Alien: Sigourney Weaver and the alien. Weaver created a new type of action hero, giving depth to the type of role that usually lacks it. And the creature’s famous creation by H.R. Giger is the stuff of nightmares. Watch the movie again. It’s horrifying. And when you combine horror expert, film critic, popular appeal and award recognition, it’s the GOAT.

READ/WATCH: How H.R. Giger Made Alien's Monster Beautiful and Terrifying by Liz Stinson for Wired

The Shining.jpg

#2) The Shining

(1980 - dir. Stanley Kubrick)

#1 -> #3 -> #5 -> #51

Jaws.jpg

#3) Jaws

(1975 - dir. Steven Spielberg)

#6 -> #4 -> #1 -> #48

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Complex The Scariest Movies of All Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Esquire 50 Scariest Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Sight & Sound Directors’ Poll Top 100, Roger Ebert’s Great Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, TimeOut 100 Best Movies of All Time as Chosen by Actors, Hollywood Reporter Hollywood's 100 Favorite Films, BBC 100 Greatest American Films, All-Time Box Office by Ticket Sales, Empire Readers’ 100 Greatest Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Picture and a Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture - Drama.

Jaws is the most popular film on this list. It was briefly the highest-grossing movie of all-time, and still holds the #7 spot on the list if measured by ticket sales. It completely changed what it meant to be a Blockbuster. But apart from that: It’s terrifying. Rarely has a person dipped as much as a toe into the ocean (or even a swimming pool!) over the past 44 years without notes from John Williams’ score making an unwelcome appearance in the back of her mind.

READ: Exploring the Pop Culture Impact of Jaws In the 1970s by Chris Cummins for Den of Geek

Rosemarys+Baby.jpg

#4) Rosemary’s Baby

(1969 - dir. Roman Polanski)

#9 -> #7 -> #12 -> #51

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Esquire 50 Scariest Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Rotten Tomatoes =Top 100 Horror Movies, TimeOut 100 Best Movies of All Time as Chosen by Actors, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists.

Coming right at the end of the 1960s, Rosemary’s Baby pits the youthful, liberated mother against the ancien regime of religion and control. Mia Farrow’s performance guides the film’s slow revelations and embodies its portrayal of domestic gaslighting and terror.

READ: The Most Cursed Hit Movie Ever Made by Rosemary Counter for Vanity Fair

28 Days Later.jpeg

#5) 28 Days Later

(2002 - dir. Danny Boyle)

#12 -> #19 -> #16 -> #7

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Complex The Scariest Movies of All Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Esquire 50 Scariest Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Empire's 100 Best British Films, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Won the Saturn Award for Best Horror Film and was nominated for a Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation (Long Form).

Its ranking here as the greatest zombie movie all time will provoke debate. But there’s a good case to be made. 28 Days Later adds human and political sophistication that was only hinted at in earlier examples of the genre. The reinvented fast-moving zombies gave new life (pun intended) to the idea of the living dead in pop culture.

READ: How Does It All End Again? by Richard Corliss for TIME

Halloween.jpg

#6) Halloween

(1978 - dir. John Carpenter)

#3 -> #32 -> #14 -> #51

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Complex The Scariest Movies of All Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Esquire 50 Scariest Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

The essential horror film to watch as a teenager. It creates a bridge between the childhood fears of monsters and bogeymen that teenagers are discarding with the adult fears of stalkers and serial killers they are taking on. Michael Myers seems to have superhuman powers, killing and terrorizing at will.

READ: The Story Behind the Original Halloween by Jason Bailey for Vulture

Psycho.jpg

#7) Psycho

(1960 - dir. Alfred Hitchcock)

#8 -> #1 -> #3

Get Out.jpg

#8) Get Out

(2017 - dir. Jordan Peele)

#52 -> #9 -> #10 -> #3

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Esquire 50 Scariest Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Yardbarker 27 Greatest Films by Black Directors that Reshaped Cinema, Guardian’s 100 Best Films of the 21st Century, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Won the Saturn Award for Best Horror Film. Was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Picutre, a Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy, a Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation (Long Form), an NCAAP Image Award for Outstanding Motion Picture and was named one of the year's 10 best films by the American Film Institute.

It’s hard for a film so recent to crack the top 10 on a FilmsRanked.com list. But Jordan Peele’s directorial debut was clearly an instant classic to critics and the general public alike. The best horror comedy on this list. Get Out is a biting, intelligent satire of racism in the United States -- as well as a hilarious, frightening film that demands multiple rewatches.

READ: Get Out is a horror film about benevolent racism. It's spine-chilling. by Alissa Wilkinson for Vox

The+Silence+of+the+Lambs.jpg

#9) The Silence of the Lambs

(1991 - dir. Jonathan Demme)

#43 -> #8 -> #41 -> #1

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Esquire 50 Scariest Movies of All Time, Roger Ebert’s Great Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Hollywood Reporter Hollywood's 100 Favorite Films, Empire Readers’ 100 Greatest Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Won the Academy Award for Best Picture, was nominated for the Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture - Drama and won the Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

Jodie Foster and Anthony Hopkins turn in the two best horror movie acting performances ever. Hopkins’ performance as the genius cannibal makes you forget the Buffalo Bill was Agent Starling’s primary target for most of the film and a horror villain in his own right.

READ: Before we knew better: Silence of the Lambs is a win for women—but fails LGBTQ culture by Annaliese Griffin for Quartz

The+Wicker+Man.jpg

#10) The Wicker Man

(1973 - dir. Robin Hardy)

#20 -> #18 -> #53 -> #15

The Exorcist.jpg

#11) The Exorcist

(1973 - dir. William Friedkin)

#7 -> #79 -> #2 -> #1

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Complex The Scariest Movies of All Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, All-Time Box Office by Ticket Sales, Empire Readers’ 100 Greatest Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture, won the Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture - Drama and won the Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

Director William Friedkin says didn’t intend to make a horror film. He says he thought he was making a film “about the mystery of faith.” It’s hard to entirely believe him, as The Exorcist is one of the most frightening -- perhaps THE most frightening -- movie in history. It was the first horror film nominated for Best Picture at the Oscars, and is the 9th most popular movie by ticket sales of any type.

READ/WATCH: Audiences had some intense reactions to The Exorcist in 1973 by Mike Vanderbilt at The A.V. Club

Evil+Dead+II.jpg

#12) Evil Dead II

(1987 - dir. Sam Raimi)

#23 -> #34 -> #21 -> #51

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

Evil Dead II is essentially a remake of The Evil Dead. It has the same basic beats as its predecessor, but way more laughs. It revels in its bad taste. If this list were called the Most Fun Horror Movies of All Time, Evil Dead II would probably be #1.

READ: Is Evil Dead 2 A Remake Or A Sequel? It's Both by Adrienne Tyler

The Fly.jpg

#13) The Fly

(1986 - dir. David Cronenberg)

#14 -> #60 -> #29 -> #7

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Esquire 50 Scariest Movies of All Time, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Won the Saturn Award for Best Horror Film and was nominated for a Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation.

Mutants and half-human creatures have become a Hollywood staple during the past 10 years, but not in the horror genre.  Usually, they're played by underwear models wearing too much foundation. That's how Goldblum’s character imagines Brundlefly at first. But Brundlefly is not Spider-Man

READ: The Fly at The Metropolis Times

Dont Look Now.jpg

#14) Don’t Look Now

(1973 - dir. Nicolas Roeg)

#39 -> #5 -> #47 -> #51

Night of the Living Dead.jpg

#15) Night of the Living Dead

(1968 - dir. George A. Romero)

#5 -> #15 -> #26

The Babadook.jpg

#16) The Babadook

(2014 - dir. Jennifer Kent)

#34 -> #14 -> #76 -> #51

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, IndieWire 100 All-Time Greatest Films Directed by Women, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

The existence of a terrifying bogeyman helped Jennifer Kent tell a story of grief, depression and dealing with darkness. Extremely strong performances by both leads make us care about the mother and son at the center of the story… and constantly fear for both their lives and their sanity.

READ: Boogeyman Nights: The Story Behind This Year’s Horror Hit ‘The Babadook’ by Sam Adams for Rolling Stone

A Nightmare on Elm Street.jpg

#17) A Nightmare on Elm Street

(1984 - dir. Wes Craven)

#13 -> #56 -> #33 -> #51

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Complex The Scariest Movies of All Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

One of the most famous slasher movies ever made. The ability of Freddy Kreuger to use the dream world to enter the world of the living has horrified teenagers and adults trying to sleep after watching this movie late at night.

READ: How we made A Nightmare on Elm Street at The Guardian

It Follows.png

#18) It Follows

(2015 - dir. David Robert Mitchell)

#38 -> #26 -> #37 -> #51

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

It Follows was acclaimed as a classic immediately after its debut at Cannes. “It” is essentially an STD that haunts our teenage protagonist. Sex and death have long been intertwined in horror, but It Follows does something unique with the convention - and posits a way to decouple that link.

READ: It Follows is a new classic of both horror and coming-of-age cinema by A.A. Dowd for The A.V. Club

The Descent.jpg

#19) The Descent

(2005 - dir. Neil Marshall)

#21 -> #132 -> #32 -> #15

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Complex The Scariest Movies of All Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Empire's 100 Best British Films, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Won the Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

Set in the Appalachian Mountains but filmed in Scotland, The Descent features a group of women on an outdoor adventure into a cave system. Of course, everything goes wrong. It was released with alternate endings, both of which are debated by fans and neither of which will be spoiled here.

LISTEN: How to Survive: The Descent: (2005) at the podcast How to Survive

Carrie.jpg

#20) Carrie

(1976 - dir. Brian De Palma)

#36 -> #41 -> #32 -> #48

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Esquire 50 Scariest Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for a Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation and a Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

The prom scene… enough said, no? Carrie deals with high school bullying, puberty and a crazy mother, like any teenager. But she’s not like any teenager. The movie inspired countless revenge fantasies -- and countless Stephen King adaptations. It was the first.

READ: The original 'Carrie' is the movie that made me want to be a critic by Owen Gleiberman at Entertainment Weekly

Dawn of the Dead.jpeg

#21) Dawn of the Dead

(1978 - dir. George A. Romero)

#17 -> #64 -> #38 -> #51

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

A sequel to Romero’s 1968 Night of the Living Dead, it famously made the connection between brain-dead zombies and consumer culture. The survivors hole up in a mall, which has been taken over by the infected. “Some kind of instinct. Memory of what they used to do. This was an important place in their lives.”

READ: The Film Canon: Dawn of the Dead (1978) by Paul Gilbert for The Young Folks

Shaun+of+the+Dead.jpg

#22) Shaun of the Dead

(2004 - dir. Edgar Wright)

#77 -> #13 -> #7 -> #15

Appears on the Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Empire's 100 Best British Films, Empire Readers’ 100 Greatest Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Won the Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

Zombie movies were at their height of their popularity in the early 21st Century: Virtually every nerd in the world had a zombie escape plan, including my former roommate who included a map of the airport and a “go bag” in his. Shaun of the Dead combined this zombie-mania with Simon Pegg’s distinctly British sense of humor to create a film celebrated as a classic in two different genres.

READ: How Shaun of the Dead Beat the Odds to Become a Cult Classic by Yohana Desta for Vanity Fair

Let+the+Right+One+In.jpg

#23) Let the Right One In

(2008 - dir. Tomas Alfredson)

#18 -> #27 -> #18

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Esquire 50 Scariest Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists.

Vampires have been associated with romance and sex at least since Tod Browning’s Dracula. So it makes sense that the top-ranking vampire movie on this list would be essentially a romance. It’s also the top foreign language film on the list, coming from Swedish director Tomas Alfredson who based it on a Swedish novel of the same name. This gives the entire production a haunting nordic atmosphere.

READ: In 2008, Let the Right One In Depicted Teenage Love as Bloodlust by Randall Colburn for Consequence of Sound

Nosferatu.jpg

#24) Nosferatu

(1922 - dir. F.W. Murnau)

#31 -> #6 -> #28

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Complex The Scariest Movies of All Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Sight & Sound Critics’ Poll Top 200, Roger Ebert’s Great Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Silent Era’s Top 100 Silent Films, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists.

Nosferatu, the 1922 German Expressionist classic, has its roots deep in the Great War. Producer Albin Grau, the driving force behind the film, was an occultist who served in the German Army during the war. It was there a Serbian farmer told him the story of how his father was a vampire, inspiring Grau to create a vampire story of his own.

READ: World War I and the Birth of Horror at The Metropolis Times

The+Cabinet+of+Dr+Caligari.jpg

#25) The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari

(1920 - dir. Robert Wiene)

#26 -> #11 -> #33

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Roger Ebert’s Great Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Silent Era’s Top 100 Silent Films, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists.

Some works of art embody their style so completely that they practically define their movement. Think Monet’s Water Lilies for Expressionist painting or Picasso’s Three Musicians for Cubism. That’s what The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari is for German Expressionism. Famously described as a precursor of Nazism by the book From Caligari to Hitler, it remains unsettling and disturbing to watch 100 years after it was first screened.


READ: The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari by Mehruss Jon Ahi and Armen Karaoghlanian for Interiors

The+Texas+Chain+Saw+Massacre.jpg

#26) The Texas Chain Saw Massacre

(1975 - dir. Tobe Hooper)

#2 -> #47 -> #29

The Thing.jpg

#27) The Thing

(1982 - dir. John Carpenter)

#11 -> #101 -> #6 -> #51

Bride+of+Frankenstein.jpg

#28) Bride of Frankenstein

(1935 - dir. James Whale)

#22 -> #15 -> #57

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Roger Ebert’s Great Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists.

From Roger Ebert: “Some movies age; others ripen. Seen today, Whale's masterpiece is more surprising than when it was made because today's audiences are more alert to its buried hints of homosexuality, necrophilia and sacrilege.”

READ: Roger Ebert’s Great Movies entry for Bride of Frankenstein

Poltergeist.jpg

#29) Poltergeist

(2000 - dir. Lars von Trier)

#15 -> #97 -> #36 -> #15

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Complex The Scariest Movies of All Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Won the Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

Anyone who grew up in suburbia can relate to this film -- and was likely terrorized by it if they saw it as a child. This is the movie that showed millions of kids that it’s not just scary old houses or graveyards that can be haunted. It could be your home. Or even your bedroom closet.

READ: Is The ‘Poltergeist’ Curse Real? Here’s The True Story Behind The Classic 1982 Horror Movie by Monica Castillo for the International Business Times

Suspiria.jpg

#30) Suspiria

(1977 - dir. Dario Argento)

Suspiria doesn't rely on sudden volume spikes or shoehorned "twist" endings, or even really gore to horrify.  It is patient and takes its time telling the story. The bright Technicolor expressionist sets, the intelligent sound mixing, and the wonderfully terrible score by Goblin create a nightmare world.

READ: 40 years of Suspiria: five films that influenced Dario Argento’s horror classic by Martyn Conterio for BFI

The+Cabin+in+the+Woods.jpg

#31) The Cabin in the Woods

(2012 - dir. Drew Goddard)

#75 -> #38 -> #23 -> #7

Appears on the Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Won the Saturn Award for Best Horror Film and was nominated for a Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation (Long Form).

You won’t see this twist coming. Really, you won’t. If you haven’t already seen The Cabin in the Woods, do so now before it gets spoiled for you.

READ: 10 Twisted Facts About The Cabin in the Woods by Scott Beggs for Mental Floss

A Quiet Place.jpg

#32) A Quiet Place

(2018 - dir. John Krasinski)

#89 -> #21 -> #25 -> #5

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Won the Saturn Award for Best Horror Film, was named one of the 10 Best Films of 2018 by the American Film Institute and was nominated for a Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation (Long Form).

John Krasinski, formerly best known as Jim from The Office, made a big mark on the horror world with his turn behind the camera. Its unique premise helps make it a classic of the genre, despite being only a year old.

READ: How John Krasinski Created 'A Quiet Place' by J.W. Bishop for Smithsonian Magazine

Frankenstein.jpg

#33) Frankenstein

(1931 - dir. James Whale)

#32 -> #23 -> #49

An+American+Werewolf+in+London.jpg

#34) An American Werewolf in London

(1982 - dir. John Landis)

#33 -> #95 -> #31 -> #15

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Empire 100 Best British Films, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Won the Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

You’d expect a comedy from director John Landis, and you get a comedy. But you also get some gruesome and genuinely horrifying scenes in this, the Greatest Werewolf Movie Ever Made.

WATCH: An American Werewolf in London Behind the Scenes - Storyboard by FandangoNOW Extras

The Witch.jpg

#35) The Witch

(2015 - dir. Robert Eggers)

#65 -> #35 -> #46 -> #51

Appears on the Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists.


The 17th Century is usually overlooked in American history classes, and Hollywood rarely sets foot there. The Witch captures the religious thinking and experience of New England homesteaders with a bent for Calvinism.


READ: The Witch: the blood, the gore, the goat - discuss the film with spoilers by Benjamin Lee for The Guardian

Hereditary.jpg

#36) Hereditary

(2018 - dir. Ari Aster)

#73 -> #28 -> #39 -> #51

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Empire 100 Greatest Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

This frightening film explores what happens when an entire family line seems to be haunted. Part family drama, part demonic horror, one of the newest and scariest entries on this list.

READ: The Creepiest Movie Shot of the Year Came From Hereditary by David Sims for The Atlantic

The Innocents.jpg

#37) The Innocents

(1961 - dir. Jack Clayton)

#10 -> #51 -> #70

Re-Animator.jpg

#38) Re-Animator

(1985 - dir. Stuart Gordon)

#55 -> #49 -> #58 -> #51

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

The cult classic was based on the H. P. Lovecraft novella. It originally got an X rating, but was edited down so it would be available in video stores.

LISTEN: Re-Animator (1985) at The Lost Drive-In

The Blair Witch Project.jpg

#39) The Blair Witch Project

(1999 - dir. Daniel Myrick, Eduardo Sánchez)

#29 -> #72 -> #95 -> #51

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Complex The Scariest Movies of All Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Esquire 50 Scariest Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

The Blair Witch Project came just at the end of an era in which a certain type of hoax could really thrive. The internet was in a condition where material could be spread very quickly, but there weren’t many tools to help someone figure out what was true and what wasn’t. Just 10 years later, film critics could quickly ruin all the fun pretty easily.

READ: How the original Blair Witch Project ushered in a new era of viral movie marketing by Rebecca Stewart for The Drum

Eyes+Without+a+Face.jpg

#40) Eyes Without a Face

(1962 - dir. Georges Franju)

#40 -> #31 -> #45

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Esquire 50 Scariest Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists.

Two things embed the film into my memory. One is the pervasive sense of creepiness that Franju seeps throughout every scene of the film. The other is Maurice Jarre's score. This was the second film he scored, and was only two years away from his soaring tracks for Lawrence of Arabia.

READ: Eyes Without a Face at The Metropolis Times

Invasion of the Body Snatchers.jpg

#41) Invasion of the Body Snatchers

(1978 - dir. Philip Kaufmann)

#56 -> #42 -> #88 -> #51

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies and Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for a Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Feature.

You at least recognize the much-memed screenshot. This is the first remake of the 1956 classic, which appears as #84 on this list.

READ: Why 'Invasion of the Body Snatchers' Still Haunts Its Director by David Weiner for The Hollywood Reporter

Aliens.jpg

#42) Aliens

(1986 - dir. James CAmeron)

#97 -> #25 -> #34 -> #15

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Empire 100 Greatest Movies, and Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies lists. Won the Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Feature.

James Cameron picked up the reins from Ridley Scott for what is arguably the best originally-unplanned sequel of all time. Sigourney Weaver deservedly got her first Academy Award nomination for her masterful action hero performance in this film.

READ: Aliens is nothing like Alien—and all the better for it by Tom Breihan for The A.V. Club

Repulsion.jpg

#43) Repulsion

(1965 - dir. Roman Polansk)

#48 -> #24 -> #55

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Esquire 50 Scariest Movies of All Time, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists.

In the 1960s, Polanski was fêted as a feminist director who was able to understand and portray on screen the horrific consequences of sexual violence inflicted upon women. The nature of Repulsion makes it impossible to watch in isolation of knowledge of its director’s biography -- he’s a rapist who made a movie about what it’s like for a woman to be raped. I’m interested in seeing how critics will evaluate and react to his work in the future.

READ: Sexual Violence and Female Experience in Roman Polanski’s Apartment Trilogy: Repulsion, Rosemary’s Baby, The Tenant by Elise Moore for Bright Lights Film Journal

Freaks.jpg

#44) Freaks

(1932 - dir. Tod Browning)

#42 -> #30 -> #71

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Esquire 50 Scariest Movies of All Time, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, and Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies lists.

Freaks is about a group of people treated like second-class citizens.  The sideshow performers have physical deformities which are exploited by the "normal" people. Freaks stands out from Hollywood fare like The Elephant Man, The Greatest Showman, or The Help, because it actually tells the story from the perspective of the oppressed.

READ: Freaks at The Metropolis Times

The Night of the Hunter.jpg

#45) The Night of the Hunter

(1955 - dir. Charles LAughton)

#45 -> #2 -> #126

The Birds.jpg

#46) The Birds

(1963 - dir. Alfred Hitchcock)

#49 -> #46 ->#22

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists.

The enigmatic bird attacks are never explained in Hitchcock’s horror masterpiece. Neither is the bizarre way they suddenly stop. Is it the end or THE end and simply the eye of the hurricane? How widespread are the attacks? The psychic link between the birds and Melanie Daniels (played by Tippi Hendren) hints at the type of Freudian theme the “Master of Suspense” was famous for.

READ: My favourite Hitchcock: The Birds by Xan Brooks for The Guardian

The Evil Dead.jpg

#47) The Evil Dead

(1981 - dir. Sam Raimi)

#63 -> #48 -> #19

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Complex The Scariest Movies of All Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists.

This shlocky movie kicked off one of the most beloved franchises in horror and nerd culture. It’s not as funny as its sequel, but its low-budget gore is what endears fans to the series.

READ: Sam Raimi’s The Evil Dead remains a masterpiece in crudity by David Konow for Consequence of Sound

Eraserhead.jpg

#48) Eraserhead

(1977 - dir. David Lynch)

#81 -> #50 -> #17

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Sight & Sound Critics’ Poll Top 200, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists.

The most direct comparison to David Lynch's Eraserhead is some of the early work of Luis Buñuel. Both are surrealist gothic artists, consciously informed by Freud. Lynch is clearly working out his own anxieties over fatherhood and carefully crafts images and sounds that can convey his horror.

READ: Eraserhead at The Metropolis Times

Cat People.jpg

#49) Cat People

(1942 - dir. Jacques Tourneur)

#45 -> #119 -> #98 -> #51

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Empire 100 Best British Films, Roger Ebert’s Great Movies, and Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for a Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation.

A shapeshifter movie with a style that is so clearly a product of its time, yet still so watchable now. The feminist subtext that may have seemed subtle then is almost too obvious now.

READ: ‘Cat People’ and a Gallery of Horror Predators by J. Hoberman for The New York Times

Near Dark.jpg

#50) Near Dark

(1987 - dir. Kathryn Bigelow)

#102 -> #53 -> #92 -> #51

Scream.jpg

#51) Scream

(1996 - dir. Wes Craven)

#25 -> #42 -> #15

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Esquire 50 Scariest Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Won the Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

Scream is a clever, dark horror comedy that defined the genre for teenagers in the 1990s. Part satire, it famously features characters who know what horror films are like - and what typically happens to the people inside of them.

READ: Film Analysis: Scream (1996) by Taylor Ryan for Borrowing Tape

The+Conjuring.jpg

#52) The Conjuring

(2013 - dir. James Wan)

#113 -> #77 -> #59 -> #15

Appears on the IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Won the Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

An old-fashioned haunted house film for the 2010s. A ghost-hunting couple find their most terrifying case yet in a spooky flick that has spawned two sequels.

READ: Reel Review: The Conjuring at Morbidly Beautiful

Hour of the Wolf.jpg

#53) Hour of the Wolf

(1968 - dir. Ingmar Bergman)

#64 -> #59 -> #119

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Sight & Sound Directors’ Poll Top 100, and Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies lists.

Many of Ingmar Bergman’s relationship dramas already feel like horror films. Hour of the Wolf is largely incomprehensible; its style is a gothic surrealism of sorts.

LISTEN: Hour Of The Wolf (1968) – Episode 52 – Decades Of Horror: The Classic Era at Gruesome Magazine

The Devil's Backbone.jpg

#54) The Devil’s Backbone

(2001 - dir. Guillermo del Toro)

#28 -> #69 -> #51

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for the Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

Del Toro was still on his way when he made The Devil’s Backbone. Critical acclaim followed. The ghost story is set during the Spanish Civil War - five years before Pan’s Labyrinth was set.

READ: Guillermo del Toro reflects on The Devil's Backbone in foreword to new book by Eric King for Entertainment Weekly

The Orphanage.jpg

#55) The Orphanage

(2007 - dir. Juan Antonio Bayona)

#85 -> #65 -> #22

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, and Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies lists.

The Orphanage earns its scares. The Spanish-language film was received by an enthusiastic audience in the U.S. despite a limited release. 

READ: The Orphanage: the film that frightened me the most by Ellie Violet Bramley for The Guardian

The Omen.jpeg

#56) The Omen

(1976 - dir. Richard Donner)

#37 -> #100 -> #51

The+Others.jpg

#57) The Others

(2001 - dir. Alejandro Amenábar)

#50 -> #96 -> #15

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Esquire 50 Scariest Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Won the Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

Nicole Kidman stars as the mother of two young children, shut up in a home on the English coast. The girl begins to see ghosts, and the haunted atmosphere makes this a movie *not* to see at home before bed.

READ: The Others Ending Explained: What Really Happened, And Why It Matters by Nick Romano for Cinema Blend

What+Ever+Happened+to+Baby+Jane.jpg

#58) Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?

(1962 - dir. Robert Aldrich)

#137 -> #33 -> #76

Appears on the IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Roger Ebert’s Great Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, and Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies lists.

One of the best psychological horror films ever made. Think of it as a horror version of Grey Gardens. Bette Davis and Joan Crawford are two of the most talented actresses in history, and they get the chance to ham it up here.

READ: What Ever Happened To Baby Jane? by Nathan Rabin for The A.V. Club

Audition.jpg

#59) Audition

(1999 - dir. Takashi Miike)

#19 -> #61

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Esquire 50 Scariest Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists.

At first we overlook the protagonists misogyny. He seems so lonely that we might be tricked into forgiving him. But we can't overlook what happens after the slow, patient setup.

READ: Audition - Slow-Boil Feminism at The Metropolis Times

Henry Portrait of a Serial Killer.jpg

#60) Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer

(1986 - dir. John McNaughton)

#30 -> #81

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Complex The Scariest Movies of All Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, and Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies lists.

The low-budget film is praised for depicting murder as the grotesque act of violence it is, rather than stylizing or sensationalizing it. Hollywood serial killers are usually geniuses… Henry might be closer to the truth.

READ: 30 years later, Henry remains a bone-chilling Portrait Of A Serial Killer by Mike D'Angelo for The A.V. Club

The+Sixth+Sense.jpg

#61) The Sixth Sense

(1999 - dir. M. Night Shyamalan)

#59 -> #100 -> #5

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, and All-Time Box Office by Ticket Sales. Won the Saturn Award for Best Horror Film, was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Picture and was nominated for a Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation.

20 years later, The Sixth Sense remains M. Night Shyamalan’s best work. It has his spirituality, his ability to create and maintain atmosphere and tension -- and has one of the most celebrated twists in Hollywood history.

READ: ‘The Sixth Sense’ Turns 20: M. Night Shyamalan and Haley Joel Osment Tell All by Mackenzie Nichols for Variety

Black Christmas.jpg

#62) Black Christmas

(1974 - dir. Bob Clark)

#46 -> #107 -> #51

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Complex The Scariest Movies of All Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Esquire 50 Scariest Movies of All Time, and Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

In the genre of Christmas horror movies, Black Christmas has no peers. (Two others made this list: Dead of Night at #113 and Gremlins at #124) But this wasn’t even Bob Clark’s best Christmas movie -- he directed A Christmas Story nine years later.

READ: 12 Surprising Facts About Black Christmas by Matthew Jackson for Mental Floss

It.jpg

#63) It

(2017 - dir. Andres Muschietti)

#37 -> #20 -> #51

Appears on the Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, All-Time Box Office by Ticket Sales, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

Pennywise the clown was already famous, thanks to a 1990 miniseries adaptation of Stephen King’s novel. This adaptation scared a new generation, and cost many real-world clowns a lot of money. A sequel, It Chapter Two was released last month.

READ: The New Version of It Is Shockingly Violent by Tyler Coates for Esquire

The+Vanishing.jpg

#64) The Vanishing

(1988 - dir. George Sluizer)

#70 -> #39

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, and Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies lists.

The Dutch film is known in that language as Spoorloos. The story of a woman who disappears at a rest stop is horrifying -- Stanley Kubrick thought it was the scariest movie he’d ever seen, and called director George Sluizer on the phone to discuss editing.

READ: The Vanishing is the original Gone Girl, with the truth learned at a price by Mike D'Angelo for The A.V. Club

Drag+Me+to+Hell.jpg

#65) Drag Me to Hell

(2009 - dir. Sam Raimi)

#159 -> #47 -> #164 -> #15

Appears on the Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Won the Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

Horror movies aren’t always known for their acting performances, but Alison Lohman shines as a loan officer who is cursed to Hell by a woman whose home she forecloses on. Clever and frightening, the film is a gem to watch.

READ: Sam Raimi’s “Drag Me to Hell” Remains a Bloody B-Movie Delight by Andrea Thompson for The Spool

Vampyr.jpg

#66) Vampyr

(1932 - dir. Carl Theodor Dreyer)

#82 -> #112 -> #111

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Sight & Sound Critics’ Poll Top 200, and Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies lists.


The plot is a little hazy, and the real fear comes from the atmosphere.  The sounds and the cuts and the washed out lights. What is Allan Gray seeing?  Who is that creepy man? Is the pale woman already past saving? In some ways, Vampyr is most suitable for background at a haunted house or Halloween party.  It's not necessarily a popcorn sit-and-watch movie like Dracula.

READ: 'Vampyr' Is the Best Vampire Movie You’ve Never Seen by Michael Curtis Nelson for Pop Matters

Dracula.jpeg

#67) Dracula

(1931 - dir. Tod Browning)

#158 -> #29 -> #81

Appears on the Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Roger Ebert’s Great Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, and Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies lists.

Bela Lugosi’s performance forever cemented the image of Count Dracula into our cultural memory. His Hungarian accent and slicked-back hair is what we think of when we imagine a vampire - not the Count Orlock of Nosferatu or Edward Cullen of Twilight.

READ: Why I Love… Bela Lugosi’s Dracula by John Oliver for BFI.

Predator.jpg

#68) Predator

(1987 - dir. John McTiernan)

#90 -> #13 -> #51

Appears on the Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

An essentially invisible monster stalks and kills a group of special ops in the Central American jungle. Most famous line: “Get to the choppa.”

READ: 'Predator': 5 reasons why the '80s Arnold Schwarzenegger original still rules by Brian Truitt for USA Today

REC.jpg

#69) [REC]

(2007 - dir. Jaume Balagueró, Paco Plaza)

#35 -> #72

Zombieland.jpg

#70) Zombieland

(2009 - dir. Ruben Fleischer)

#55 -> #15 -> #51

Appears on the Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

It’s in the debate with Shaun of the Dead as the funniest zombie movie ever made. It certainly has the best surprise cameo in horror history.

READ: Zombieland by Nathan Rabin for The A.V. Club

Hellraiser.jpg

#71) Hellraiser

(1987 - dir. Clive Barker)

#127 -> #91 -> #51

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Complex The Scariest Movies of All Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

Many horror films forget there are things worse than death. Hellraiser threatens its hapless victims with a portal to a dimension of eternal pain… or is it pleasure?

READ: All The Weirdest Secrets You Never Knew About Clive Barker's Hellraiser by Abhimanyu Das and Charlie Jane Anders for Gizmodo

Nosferatu the Vampyre.jpg

#72) Nosferatu the Vampyre

(1979 - dir. Werner Herzog)

#166 -> #20 -> #118

possession-1200-1200-675-675-crop-000000.jpg

#73) Possession

(1981 - dir. Andrzej Żuławski)

#53 -> #52

The Haunting.jpg

#74) The Haunting

(1963 - dir. Robert Wise)

#41 -> #89

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Complex The Scariest Movies of All Time, and Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies lists.

This was based on The Haunting of Hill House, the same novel the 2018 Netflix series comes from. Martin Scorsese once called it “the scariest movie of all time.”

READ: Flashback: The Haunting (1963) by George E. Turner for American Cinematographer

The+Fog.jpg

#75) The Fog

(1980 - dir. John Carpenter)

#68 -> #131 -> #51

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Empire 50 Best Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

This is the ghostly story of a strange, glowing fog invading a coastal California town. John Carpenter cast many actors from his magnum opus Halloween, which he made two years earlier.

READ: 12 Clear Facts About John Carpenter's The Fog by Eric D. Snider at Mental Floss

Deep Red.jpg

#76) Profondo rosso

(1975 - dir. Dario Argento)

#51 -> #85

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Esquire 50 Scariest Movies of All Time, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists.

Also known as ‘Deep Red’ or ‘The Hatchet Murders.’ One of the best known Italian giallo films, the story behind its gruesome murders are investigated by a pianist.
READ: Profondo Rosso, a.k.a. Deep Red at Scene Point Blank

Dont Breathe.jpg

#77) Don’t Breathe

(2016 - dir. Fede Álvarez)

#65 -> #84 -> #15

Appears on the Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies. Won the Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

Three thieves break into a blind man’s home… but things don’t exactly go according to plan. The movie thrilled audiences when it came out in 2016, and it’s amazingly remained spoiler-free years later.

READ: The F*cked-Up Twist to 'Don't Breathe' Exists to Offend by Dan Jackson

Train+to+Busan.jpg

#78) Train to Busan

(2016 - dir. Sang-ho Yeon)

#62 -> #65 -> #51

Appears on the Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies. Was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

There have been a lot of zombie apocalypse movies over the past 20 years. Train to Busan is one of the most inventive. The outbreak spreads from car to car, as terrified passengers try to flee and avoid the walking dead.

READ: The Undead Pack an Emotional Punch in “Train to Busan” by Selena Lee for Yale Daily News

Videodrome.png

#79) Videodrome

(1983 - dir. David Cronenberg)

#72 -> #27

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies.

David Cronenberg's Videodrome explores the disorienting ways that new media technology ruthlessly transforms not only our shared cultures, but also our very bodies and minds.

READ: Your Changing Body - Videodrome and Marshall McLuhan

Jacobs Ladder.jpg

#80) Jacob’s Ladder

(1990 - dir. Adrian Lyne)

#60 -> #81

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies.

A Vietnam War veteran experiences strange visions upon returning home to the States. (The title takes its name from the vision in Genesis 28:12) It turns out, so do some of the men he fought with. The bizarre film has influenced horror movies and video games made into the 21st Century.

READ: Why Isn’t This More Well Known? by tdb5301 at Trim Theme

Under+the+SKin.jpg

#81) Under the Skin

(2013 - dir. Jonathan Glazer)

#84 -> #113 -> #210

Appears on the Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, Esquire 50 Scariest Movies of All Time, Guardian’s 100 Best Films of the 21st Century and the Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies lists.

Scarlett Johansson plays an alien vampire who seduces men and kills them. The score helps give the film an otherworldly atmosphere that makes Scotland seem as alien to Johansson’s character as her homeland might seem to us.

READ: Under the Skin by Adrian Helen at Horror News Net

Kwaidan.jpg

#82) Kwaidan

(1965 - dir. Masaki Kobayashi)

#86 -> #121 -> #51

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, and the Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film.

Kwaidan is an anthology film. It contains four separate narratives, each adapted from traditional Japanese ghost stories. The beautiful legends stick with you long after viewing.

READ: Japanese horror anthology Kwaidan is low on frights, very high on striking imagery by Mike D'Angelo for The A.V. Club

Carnival of Souls.jpg

#83) Carnival of Souls

(1962 - dir. Herk Harvey)

#27 -> #188

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Esquire 50 Scariest Movies of All Time, and the Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies lists.

The extremely low budget ($33,000) independent horror film wasn’t recognized as a classic until decades after its release. A woman survives a car wreck and moves to Salt Lake City to become a church organist. But what is that strange abandoned pavilion on the shores of the lake?

READ: Dead in the Water? Dream and Reality in Carnival of Souls by Peter Wilshire for Off Screen

Invasion of the Body Snatchers.jpg

#84) Invasion of the Body Snatchers

(1956 - dir. Don Siegel)

#66 -> #77

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, and the Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies lists.

Endlessly re-interpreted, the Cold War classic is usually said to have something to do with communism.Whether the “pod people” are the reds or the McCarthyites is besides the point; the film tapped into contemporary (and current!) fears of conformity.

READ: Was "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" intended as political allegory? by Jeff Saporito at Screen Prism

Pennies+from+Heaven.jpg

#85) Phantasm

(1979 - dir. Don Coscarelli)

#78 -> #173 -> #51

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Complex The Scariest Movies of All Time, and the Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

Two boys discover bizarre happenings in their local funeral home. The low-budget indie film has become a cult classic and spawned several sequels. Why isn’t it more widely known?

READ: Retro Rewind: 'Phantasm' (1979) by Vikrant Nallaparaju for The Emory Wheel

House of Wax.jpg

#86) House of Wax

(1953 - dir. Andre DeToth

#45 -> #61

Appears on the Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, the All-Time Box Office by Ticket Sales, and the Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies lists.

Released near the beginning of the 1950s 3-D craze, House of Wax features Vincent Price as the creepy owner of a wax museum.

READ: 13 Thrilling Facts About House of Wax by Mark Mancini at MentalFloss

The+Devils.jpg

#87) The Devils

(1971 - dir. Ken Russell)

#58 -> 143

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, and the Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies lists.

A story of witchhunting and exorcism, set in 17th Century France. If you’re at all uncomfortable with blasphemy, skip this one. Several scenes were excised from the film before release in 1971, and they’ve been missing from every DVD/Blu-Ray and streaming release even in the 21st Century.

READ: ‘The Devils’ Is Just As Blasphemous, Bawdy, and Relevant Today As It Was When It Was Banned In 1971 by June Dry for IndieWire
ALSO READ: Roger Ebert’s sarcastic 0-star negative review

Bram Stokers Dracula.jpg

#88) Bram Stoker’s Dracula

(1992 - dir. Francis Ford Coppola)

#128 -> #79 -> #7

Appears on the IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies. Won the Saturn Award for Best Horror Film and was nominated for a Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation.

Francis Ford Coppola gave us “the horror!” in Apocalypse Now, and tried his hand at horror here. The beautiful gothic costumes and sets make up for Keanu Reeves’ acting.

READ: 25 Crazy Facts Behind the Making of Bram Stoker’s Dracula by Christopher Fidducia at ScreenRant

Peeping+Tom.jpg

#89) Peeping Tom

(1960 - dir. Michael Powell)

#80 -> #102

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, Roger Ebert’s Great Movies, and Empire 100 Best British Films lists.

Michael Powell was best known for Technicolor fantasies like The Thief of Bagdad and A Matter of Life and Death when his Peeping Tom surprised and disturbed audiences who were expecting something in his more usual style. His reputation suffered, but the ‘slasher’ later became a more mainstream genre and his film is now lauded as a horror classic.

READ: Peeping Tom & the Male Gaze at The Metropolis Times

The Beyond.jpg

#90) The Beyond

(1981 - dir. Lucio Fulci)

#44 -> #191

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, Complex The Scariest Movies of All Time, and the Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies lists.

Lucio Fulci’s surreal, supernatural story takes place in New Orleans, at a gate to the afterworld. Fulci said he considered it an “absolute film,” with the bizarre, haunting images taking priority over a traditional narrative.

READ: The Beyond by Mark Pellegrini at Adventures in Poor Taste

The Phantom of the Opera.jpg

#91) The Phantom of the Opera

(1925 - dir. Rupert Julian)

#17 -> #136

Appears on the Roger Ebert’s Great Movies, Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Silent Era’s Top 100 Silent Films, and Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies lists.

Lon Chaney famously devised his own ghastly appearance for this film, keeping it a secret until the premiere. Released just 15 years after Gaston Leroux’s novel, it’s a silent film -- something almost unthinkable after Andrew Lloyd Webber.

READ: The Phantom of the Opera (1925) A Silent Film Review by Fritzi Kramer for Movies Silently

The Unknown.jpg

#92) The Unknown

(1927 - dir. Tod Browning)

#106 -> #116 -> #209

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films,Silent Era’s Top 100 Silent Films, and Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies lists.

Before Freaks, Tod Browning made a circus horror classic with The Unknown, featuring Lon Chaney and Joan Crawford. It’s short - its running time is just 50 minutes - but every minute is well-spent.

READ: The Unknown by Scott Brogan for the San Francisco Silent Film Festival

Black Sunday.jpg

#93) Black Sunday

(1960 - dir. Mario Bava)

#62 -> #150

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, and Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies lists.

Also known as ‘The Mask of Satan’ and ‘Revenge of the Vampire.’ These 17th Century witchfinders actually burned themselves a real witch - but will they curse their own success? Director Mario Bava’s first feature film, and an early exemplar of classic Italian horror.

READ: Black Sunday by Scott Tobias at The A.V. Club

The Tenant.jpg

#94) The Tenant

(1976 - dir. Roman Polanski)

#69 -> #134

Appears on the TimeOut 100 Best Horror Films, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, and Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies lists.

The last entry in Roman Polanski’s “Apartment Trilogy.” The plot of the psychological horror is better left unstated here. Any progressive readings of the film are neutered by knowledge of Polanski’s true predatory nature.

READ: The Tenant by Jake Euker for Pop Matters

The+Changeling.jpg

#95) The Changeling

(1980 - dir. Peter Medak)

#57 -> #171

Little+Shop+of+Horrors.jpg

#96) Little Shop of Horrors

(1986 - dir. Frsnk Ox)

#71 -> #158 -> #46

Appears on the Rotten Tomatoes Top 100 Horror Movies, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy, Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, and the Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

The musical rock horror comedy is bigger on laughs than scares, but Audrey II is genuinely horrifying. 

READ: The spectacularly tragic Little Shop Of Horrors that wasn’t by Darryn King at The Dissolve

Little Shop of Horrors also appears on the FilmsRanked 200 Greatest Musicals list.

Godzilla.jpg

#97) Godzilla

(1954 - dir. Ishirô Honda)

The longest-running movie franchise in history got its start here. Godzilla is the best known kaiju film, and *everyone* knows the image of the giant, dinosaur-like monster trampling cities underfoot.

READ: Gojira at the Atomic Heritage Foundation

Pulse.jpg

#98) Pulse

(2001 - Kiyoshi Kurosawa)

#24

Appears on the Appears on the Appears on the Time Out 100 Best Horror Films, Film School Rejects 50 Best Horror Movies Ever, IndieWire 100 Greatest Horror Movies of All-Time, Collider 75 Best Horror Movies of All Time, and Esquire 50 Scariest Movies of All Time lists.

This is for the 2001 Japanese original, not the later American remake of the same name. You may find it listed as Kairo. Widely regarded by horror critics as one of the most frightening films ever made, especially the first half-hour. It hasn’t gotten as much of an American cult following as it deserves.

READ: “Pulse” (“Kairo”) (2001): A Creepy Modern Classic Of Terror, Isolation, & Dread by Paul Cardullo for Gruesome Magazine

The+Mist.jpg

#99) The Mist

(2007 - dir. Frank Darabont)

#116 -> #139 -> #51

Appears on the Appears on the Time Out 100 Best Horror Films, Flickchart Users’ Favorite Horror Movies, and Letterboxd Most Popular Horror Movies lists. Was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

An unknown, mysterious mist covers the town. Survivors find themselves trapped inside a grocery store. This is the premise for one of the most interesting horror movies of the decade — and the setup for one of its most divisive endings.

READ: Why 'The Mist' Is Still One of The Ballsiest, Most Relevant Movies of the 21st Century by Haleigh Foutch for Collider

Ginger+Snaps.jpg

#100) Ginger Snaps

(2000 - dir. John Fawcett)

#101 -> #100

Appears on the Appears on the Time Out 100 Best Horror Films and Rotten Tomatoes 100 Best Horror Movies lists.

A “biting” satire on teenage life that uses lycanthropy as a stand-in for menstruation. One of the few werewolf movies on the list, and easily the most creative of the bunch.

READ: The golden age of horror: Ginger Snaps by Chris Hornbostel and Barac Wiley for Quarter to Three

101. Goodnight Mommy (Ich seh, Ich seh) (2015 - dir. Veronika Franz, Severin Fiala)
102. A Girl Walks Home at Night (2014 - dir. Ana Lily Amirpour)
103. It Comes At Night (2017 - dir. Trey Edward Shults)
104. The Host (2006 - dir. Joon-ho Bong)
105. The Conjuring 2 (2016 - dir. James Wan)
106. Horror of Dracula (1958 - dir. Terence Fisher)
107. Candyman (1992 - dir. Bernard Rose)
108. Day of the Dead (1985 - dir. George A. Romero)
109. Paranormal Activity (2007 - dir. Oren Peli)
110. Martyrs (2008 - dir. Pascap Laugier)
111. Les Diaboliques (1955 - dir. Henri-Georges Clouzot)
112. Dead of Night (1945 - dir. Alberto Cavalcanti, Charles Chrichton)
113. The Skin I Live In (2011 - dir. Pedro Almodóvar)
114. Let Me In (2010 - dir. Matt Reeves)
115. Wolf Creek (2005 - dir. Greg Mclean)
116. The Legend of Hell House (1973 - dir. John Hough)
117. King Kong (1933 - dir. Leo McCarey)
118. Split (2017 - dir. M. Night Shyamalan)
119. Raw (2016 - dir. Julia Ducournau)
120. Cronos (1994 - dir. Guillermo del Toro)
121. The Brood (1979 - dir. David Cronenberg)
122. Funny Games (1997 - dir. Michael Haneke)
123. Suspiria (2018 - dir. Luca Guadagnino)
124. Gremlins (1984 - dir. Joe Dante)
125. The Ring (2002 - dir. Gore Verbinski)
126. The Love Witch (2016 - dir. Anna Biller)
127. Gerald’s Game (2017 - dir. Mike Flanagan)
128. The Dead Zone (1983 - dir. David Cronenberg)
129. I Walked with a Zombie (1943 - dir. Jacques Tourneur)
130. Evil Dead (2013 - dir. Fede Alvarez)
131. Bone Tomahawk (2015 - S. Craig Zahler)
132. The Autopsy of Jane Done (2016 - dir. André Øvredal)
133. Frankenweenie (2012 - dir. Tim Burton)
134. The Old Dark House (1932 - dir. James Whale)
135. Dead Alive (1992 - dir. Peter Jackson)
136. Misery (1990 - dir. Rob Reiner)
137. From Dusk Till Dawn (1996 - dir. Robert Rodriguez)
138. The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975 - dir. Jim Sharman) Also appears on the FilmsRanked 200 Greatest Movie Musicals list.
139. Army of Darkness (1992 - dir. Sam Raimi)
140. Interview with the Vampire (1994 - dir. Neil Jordan)
141. Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me (1992 - dir. David Lynch)
142. Santa sangre (1989 - dir. Alejandro Jodorowsky)
143. Cannibal Holocaust (1979 - dir. Ruggero Deodato)
144. Faust (1926 - dir. F.W. Murnau)
145. Dead Ringers (1988 - dir. David Cronenberg)
146. The Lost Boys (1987 - dir. Joel Schumacher)
147. I Saw the Devil (2010 - dir. Kim Jee-woon)
148. I Am Legend (2007 - dir. Francis Lawrence)
149. Ringu (1998 - dir. Hideo Nakata)
150. Black Sabbath (1963 - dir. Mario Bava)
151. Annihilation (2018 - dir. Alex Garland)
152. Us (2019 - dir. Jordan Peele)
153. Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street (2007 - dir. Tim Burton)
154. The House of the Devil (2009 - dir. Ti West)
155. The Strangers (2008 - dir. Bryan Bertino)
156. Häxan (Witchcraft Through the Ages) (1922 - dir. Benjamin Christensen)
157. Sleepy Hollow (1999 - dir. Tim Burton)
158. Better Watch Out (2017 - dir. Chris Peckover)
159. Crimson Peak (2015 - dir. Guillermo del Toro)
160. Dressed to Kill (1980 - dir. Brian De Palma)
161. A Tale of Two Sisters (2003 - dir. Kim Jee-woon)
162. Slither (2006 - dir. James Gunn)
163. House on Haunted Hill (1959 - dir. William Castle)
164. Antichrist (2009 - dir. Lars von Trier)
165. The Loved Ones (2012 - dir. Sean Byrne)
166. Lake Mungo (2008 - dir. Joel Anderson)
167. Halloween (2018 - dir. David Gordon Green)
168. Switchblade Romance (2003 - dir. Alexandre Aja)
169. Night of the Demon (1957 - dir. Jacques Tourneur)
170. Sisters (1973 - dir. Brian De Palma)
171. From Beyond (1986 - dir. Stuart Gordon)
172. The Endless (2018 – dir. Justin Benson, Aaron Moorhead)
173. Kill, Baby… Kill! (1966 – dir. Mario Bava)
174. CAM (2018 – dir. Daniel Goldhaber)
175. Fright Night (1985 – dir. Tom Holland)
176. God Told Me To (1976 – dir. Larry Cohen)
177. The Return of the Living Dead (1985 – dir. Dan O’Bannon)
178. Village of the Damned (1960 – dir. Wolf Rilla)
179. We Are Still Here (2015 – dir. Ted Geoghegan)
180. Martin (1978 – dir. George A. Romero)
181. Saw (2004 – dir. James Wan)
182. Upgrade (2018 – dir. Leigh Whannell)
183. The Purge (2013 – dir. James DeMonaco)
184. Session 9 (2001 – dir. Brad Anderson)
185. The Devil’s Candy (2017 – dir. Sean Byrne)
186. Backcountry (2014 – dir. Adam MacDonald)
187. The Phantom Carriage (1921 – dir. Victor Sjöström)
188. Creepshow (1982 – dir. George A. Romero)
189. Society (1989 – dir. Brian Yuzna)
190. In the Mouth of Madness (1995 – dir. John Carpenter)
191. Hangover Square (1945 – dir. John Brahm)
192. House (1977 – dir. Victor Sjöström)
193. The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957 – dir. Jack Arnold)
194. The Sentinel (1977 – dir. Michael Winner)
195. Overlord (2018 – dir. Julius Avery)
196. Cemetery Man (1994 – dir. Michele Soavi)
197. Pet Sematary (2019 – dir. Kevin Kölsch, Dennis Widmyer)
198. Green Room (2015 – dir. Jeremy Saulnier)
199. Ganja & Hess (1973 - dir. Bill Gunn)
200. The Visit (2015 - dir. M. Night Shyamalan)


Follow this link to view the list on IMDb
Follow this link to view the list on iCheckMovies
Follow this link to view the list on Letterboxd

LIST NOTES

Number of films from each decade:
1920s: 7
1930s: 8
1940s: 4
1950s: 9
1960s: 17
1970s: 29
1980s: 33
1990s: 20
2000s: 29
2010s: 45

Oldest Film: The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari from 1920

Newest Films: Us and Pet Semetary from 2019

Year with the most represented films:
2018 with 9 (A Quiet Place, Hereditary, Suspiria, Annihiliation, Halloween, The Endless, CAM, Upgrade, Overlord)

Directors with 5 films listed:
David Cronenberg (The Fly, Videodrome, The Brood, The Dead Zone, Dead Ringers)
George A. Romero (Night of the Living Dead, Dawn of the Dead, Day of the Dead, Martin, Creepshow)

Directors with 4 films listed:
John Carpenter (Halloween, The Thing, The Fog, In the Mouth of Madness)
Sam Raimi (Evil Dead II, The Evil Dead, Drag Me to Hell, Army of Darkness)

Directors with 3 films listed:
Mario Bava (Black Sunday, Black Sabbath, Kill, Baby... Kill!)
Tod Browning (Freaks, Dracula, The Unknown)
Tim Burton (Frankenweenie, Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, Sleepy Hollow)
Brian De Palma (Carrie, Dressed to Kill, Sisters)
Guillermo del Toro (The Devil's Backbone, Cronos, Crimson Peak)
Roman Polanski (Rosemary's Baby, Repulsion, The Tenant)
M. Night Shyamalan (The Sixth Sense, Split, The Visit)
Jacques Tourneur (Cat People, I Walked with a Zombie, Night of the Demon)
James Wan (The Conjuring, The Conjuring 2, Saw)
James Whale (Bride of Frankenstein, Frankenstein, The Old Dark House)

Directors with 2 films listed:
Dario Argento (Suspiria, Profondo rosso)
Sean Byrne (The Loved Ones, The Devil's Candy)
Wes Craven (A Nightmare on Elm Street, Scream)
Stuart Gordon (Re-Animator, From Beyond)
Tobe Hooper (The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, Poltergeist)
Kim Jee-woon (I Saw the Devil, A Tale of Two Sisters)
David Lynch (Eraserhead, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me)
F.W. Murnau (Nosferatu, Faust)
Jordan Peele (Get Out, Us)